Drugs


insomniaWhen a person starts using opiates regularly, these opiates is much more stimulating than the ones that a person is born with. When a person is withdrawing from opiates it is very common for them to experience very lengthy periods of insomnia. So lengthy that it could be weeks before they get any sleep at all but often years before the insomnia disappears entirely, if ever.

There are some drugs that the doctor can prescribe for short term insomnia that will not risk a concurrent addiction. Most of the withdrawal symptoms have to be worked out on their own, which unfortunately is the main reason that when opiate users do not use replacement therapy to come off of opiates, the success rate is very narrow.

It takes a very strong person and one that is much convicted to be able to fight off this demon and cope with the side effects and the icing on the cake is the unwelcome insomnia. When a person starts using opiates regularly, these opiates is much more stimulating than the ones that a person is born with. When a person is withdrawing from opiates it is very common for them to experience very lengthy periods of insomnia.

Insomnia is one of the dreadful side effects that one experiences when they are going through opiate withdrawal. Opiates include but are not limited to Heroin, Oxycontins, Dilaudid, Codeine, Vicodin, and Morphine. Opiates are extremely difficult to come down off of, more difficult than probably any other drug besides maybe alcohol.

Doctors might recommend that the addict begin a treatment recovery program using Suboxone or Methadone. Both of these are long term treatments making the body feel as if it has the opiate in it, of course never getting a high from either, and more importantly, these medications block the opioid receptors so even if the person decided to use, there would be no effect from the opiate at all. This is a very effective treatment and one that will likely reduce any further displays of insomnia.

Most of the withdrawal symptoms have to be worked out on their own, which unfortunately is the main reason that when opiate users do not use replacement therapy to come off of opiates, the success rate is very narrow. Both of these are long term treatments making the body feel as if it has the opiate in it, of course never getting a high from either, and more importantly, these medications block the opioid receptors so even if the person decided to use, there would be no effect from the opiate at all.